Loyd McIntosh

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Look Up In The Sky ….
I’ve been a little negligent keeping this blog up to date, but, hey, better late than never. Anyway,  I had a really cool piece published in the January issue of B-Metro Magazine on several experimental pilots throughout the Birmingham area. I’ve become fascinated with the idea of someone spending the time, money, and energy to build their own airplane, and then having the cojones to actually get in the darn thing and fly it himself. This article gave me the chance to explore that idea.
I interviewed a handful of local pilots and got to fly in a couple of interesting planes for the piece, taking the controls for a few minutes as well. My favorite of the two planes was, without a doubt, the 1946 Erco Ercoupe, owned by Mr. Johnny Ward of Shelby County, Alabama. We took it up in the air late in the afternoon on a beautiful October day in central Alabama. It’s an open cockpit plane, so the experience is similar to riding around in a convertible with the exception of being about 1,500 feet in the air, of course. We flew over several local landmarks including American Village and my Alma mater, the University of Montevallo. If you ever get a chance to fly in one of these, don’t pass it up. Heckuva lot of fun.
I didn’t get a chance, however, to fly in the Breezy, much to my disappointment, although my wife was thrilled those plans fell through. Another time.
Also, I need to give a shout out to the photographer on the story, the always brilliant Beau Gustafson.
Read the story here.

Look Up In The Sky ….

I’ve been a little negligent keeping this blog up to date, but, hey, better late than never. Anyway,  I had a really cool piece published in the January issue of B-Metro Magazine on several experimental pilots throughout the Birmingham area. I’ve become fascinated with the idea of someone spending the time, money, and energy to build their own airplane, and then having the cojones to actually get in the darn thing and fly it himself. This article gave me the chance to explore that idea.

I interviewed a handful of local pilots and got to fly in a couple of interesting planes for the piece, taking the controls for a few minutes as well. My favorite of the two planes was, without a doubt, the 1946 Erco Ercoupe, owned by Mr. Johnny Ward of Shelby County, Alabama. We took it up in the air late in the afternoon on a beautiful October day in central Alabama. It’s an open cockpit plane, so the experience is similar to riding around in a convertible with the exception of being about 1,500 feet in the air, of course. We flew over several local landmarks including American Village and my Alma mater, the University of Montevallo. If you ever get a chance to fly in one of these, don’t pass it up. Heckuva lot of fun.

I didn’t get a chance, however, to fly in the Breezy, much to my disappointment, although my wife was thrilled those plans fell through. Another time.

Also, I need to give a shout out to the photographer on the story, the always brilliant Beau Gustafson.

Read the story here.

Feb 2
Broadway Joe Stylin’
While the game itself is turning out to be a dud, Joe Namath added his own sense of style to the Super Bowl this evening, styling a full-length, fur coat. Who else but Broadway Joe could pull this look off.
By the way, it’s shameless plug time. I have an interview with Joe Namath in the current issue of Tailgater Monthly magazine. I had a chance to talk to him for about an hour last fall, discussing an array of topics, but mostly the events leading up to his famous prediction in Super Bowl III. Now 70, Namath still has that sense of humor and a unique perspective on his role in sports, pop culture, and being the man largely responsible for turning this annual football game into a de facto national holiday. Read it here, and send me a note to let me know what you think.

Broadway Joe Stylin’

While the game itself is turning out to be a dud, Joe Namath added his own sense of style to the Super Bowl this evening, styling a full-length, fur coat. Who else but Broadway Joe could pull this look off.

By the way, it’s shameless plug time. I have an interview with Joe Namath in the current issue of Tailgater Monthly magazine. I had a chance to talk to him for about an hour last fall, discussing an array of topics, but mostly the events leading up to his famous prediction in Super Bowl III. Now 70, Namath still has that sense of humor and a unique perspective on his role in sports, pop culture, and being the man largely responsible for turning this annual football game into a de facto national holiday. Read it here, and send me a note to let me know what you think.

Oct 4
Around the Block: Montevallo
My latest Around The Block piece published in the August issue of Birmingham Magazine is on the small college town of Montevallo, Alabama. Although I started college at UAB I earned my degree in English from the University of Montevallo in 1995 and did a little graduate work there as well. I even met my wife there waaaaayyyyy back in 1997. 
The university is a small liberal arts college smack in the middle of rural Shelby County. Not surprisingly, the town is a bit quirky, but really cool. The city is also going through a bit of a renaissance recently, as well, and I had a chance to write about some of the places and happening that are giving Montevallo a little zing these days. Take a minute to read it and, if you’re in the area, be sure to visit some of these spots.

Around the Block: Montevallo

My latest Around The Block piece published in the August issue of Birmingham Magazine is on the small college town of Montevallo, Alabama. Although I started college at UAB I earned my degree in English from the University of Montevallo in 1995 and did a little graduate work there as well. I even met my wife there waaaaayyyyy back in 1997.

The university is a small liberal arts college smack in the middle of rural Shelby County. Not surprisingly, the town is a bit quirky, but really cool. The city is also going through a bit of a renaissance recently, as well, and I had a chance to write about some of the places and happening that are giving Montevallo a little zing these days. Take a minute to read it and, if you’re in the area, be sure to visit some of these spots.

Superman II
My newest piece in Birmingham Magazine is the inspirational story of young man named Thomas from the small town of Ashville, Alabama. Thomas was a seven-year-old little boy who, after being diagnosed with a rare form of cancer, became known to the entire community as Superman, but to one teenager in the town, he became much more.
Ethan Fuller, currently a senior on the Ashville Bulldogs football team, was chosen to carry Thomas  out onto the field during a game last season. In the months that followed, Ethan became something of a big brother to Thomas, right up until “Superman” passed away last spring. Ethan remains a friend to Thomas’ family, even growing his hair long and donating several inches of it for a local cancer charity. 
This fall the entire community, including Thomas’ beloved Ashville Bulldogs, are busy honoring their little Superman, hoping to raise awareness and money to help those dealing with childhood cancer.
I happened to know Ethan’s father, Jeff, personally - we were teammates on a bunch of soccer teams in high school and as young adults - and was honored when he asked me to write this story. Please take a few minutes to read and let me know your thoughts.

Superman II

My newest piece in Birmingham Magazine is the inspirational story of young man named Thomas from the small town of Ashville, Alabama. Thomas was a seven-year-old little boy who, after being diagnosed with a rare form of cancer, became known to the entire community as Superman, but to one teenager in the town, he became much more.

Ethan Fuller, currently a senior on the Ashville Bulldogs football team, was chosen to carry Thomas  out onto the field during a game last season. In the months that followed, Ethan became something of a big brother to Thomas, right up until “Superman” passed away last spring. Ethan remains a friend to Thomas’ family, even growing his hair long and donating several inches of it for a local cancer charity.

This fall the entire community, including Thomas’ beloved Ashville Bulldogs, are busy honoring their little Superman, hoping to raise awareness and money to help those dealing with childhood cancer.

I happened to know Ethan’s father, Jeff, personally - we were teammates on a bunch of soccer teams in high school and as young adults - and was honored when he asked me to write this story. Please take a few minutes to read and let me know your thoughts.

College Football’s Mouth of the South
Time for KICKOFF! While you’re cheering on your favorite team, take a few minutes to read my interview with southeastern football radio legend Paul Finebaum!

College Football’s Mouth of the South

Time for KICKOFF! While you’re cheering on your favorite team, take a few minutes to read my interview with southeastern football radio legend Paul Finebaum!

Low Kung Fu!

I was talking with a friend of mine last night and about how much things cost these days, and I jokingly said I’m going to start wearing English Leather or Clubman Pinaud rather than continue shelling out close to $100 for a bottle fancy-schmancy, froo-froo smelling “mens” cologne. She replied by telling me after her father passed away her family found a few unopen bottles of the old aftershave and cologne Hai Karate, the classic 1960s and 1970s  product for men.

Discontinued in the early 1980s, Hai Karate was one of those beginner colognes on the same level as Brut and Old Spice, but had one the coolest advertising campaigns of the era. As you see in this television commercial, Hai Karate caused women to go so crazy, that each bottle came with a set of detailed self-defense instructions. Proof that the marketers of Axe know that there is no reason to reinvent the wheel, Hai Karate’s tag line was a good one: “Be careful how you use it.”

Since Hai Karate has disappeared from drug store shelves and, also, since the world is in a constant state of retro fever, bottles of Hai Karate are a collector’s item, going for some good money on ebay. It might be worth rummaging through your father’s - or grandfather’s - old boxes in the attic.

March has been a good month for me in terms of freelance writing, with four pieces in three different magazines. This one for Birmingham Magazine titled Birmingham Sportsville, U.S.A., is, without a doubt, the most comprehensive. A story I began working almost a year ago, I wanted to learn how, over the last decade and a half my hometown of Birmingham, Alabama, has become a go-to city for an array of special sporting events. Since the mid-1990s Birmingham has successfully the following:
An annual event on the PGA Senior/ChampionsTour
Soccer matches during the 1996 Olympic Games
Davis Cup Tennis matches
The 2011 and 2012 NCAA College Cup Mens Soccer Championships
IZOD IndyCar series racing at Barber Motorsports Park
Professional Bowler’s Association tour stops for two years
The city is also preparing to open the new downtown baseball complex, Regions Field in the middle of downtown Birmingham. The stadium will be home to the AA Birmingham Barons, marking the first time the minor league club has been in the downtown area since it left Rickwood Field back in the mid 1980s. All of this is happening in a city that has called itself the Football Capital of the South for almost a century.
That phrase can still be seen painted on the side of Legion Field, an aging football stadium known around football circles as the Old Gray Lady - old being the operative term. The stadium which hosted decades of epic University of Alabama football games while Bear Bryant roamed the sidelines hasn’t hosted a Crimson Tide game in almost ten years. These days, Legion Field hosts UAB Blazers home games to tepid crowds, and lost the state high school championships which left for to Auburn and Tuscaloosa (alternating years). Meanwhile, Birmingham struggles to gain support for a multipurpose domed facility that city leaders have wanted to build for close to 20 years.
I had a chance to attend a some cool events, including the 2012 Honda IndyCar Grand Prix of Alabama, and I was able to interview some of great drivers including Charlie Kimball and Joao Barbosa for the story. Take a few minutes to read the story and drop me a line to let me know your thoughts.

March has been a good month for me in terms of freelance writing, with four pieces in three different magazines. This one for Birmingham Magazine titled Birmingham Sportsville, U.S.A., is, without a doubt, the most comprehensive. A story I began working almost a year ago, I wanted to learn how, over the last decade and a half my hometown of Birmingham, Alabama, has become a go-to city for an array of special sporting events. Since the mid-1990s Birmingham has successfully the following:

The city is also preparing to open the new downtown baseball complex, Regions Field in the middle of downtown Birmingham. The stadium will be home to the AA Birmingham Barons, marking the first time the minor league club has been in the downtown area since it left Rickwood Field back in the mid 1980s. All of this is happening in a city that has called itself the Football Capital of the South for almost a century.

That phrase can still be seen painted on the side of Legion Field, an aging football stadium known around football circles as the Old Gray Lady - old being the operative term. The stadium which hosted decades of epic University of Alabama football games while Bear Bryant roamed the sidelines hasn’t hosted a Crimson Tide game in almost ten years. These days, Legion Field hosts UAB Blazers home games to tepid crowds, and lost the state high school championships which left for to Auburn and Tuscaloosa (alternating years). Meanwhile, Birmingham struggles to gain support for a multipurpose domed facility that city leaders have wanted to build for close to 20 years.

I had a chance to attend a some cool events, including the 2012 Honda IndyCar Grand Prix of Alabama, and I was able to interview some of great drivers including Charlie Kimball and Joao Barbosa for the story. Take a few minutes to read the story and drop me a line to let me know your thoughts.

Deep Fried Goodness

Frankies Fried Pies

My newest piece in Discover St. Clair focuses on one of my favorite things - fried foods. Specifically, fried pies. Here in St Clair County, Alabama, Frankie Underwood is the undisputed queen of the fried pie, a sill she picked up in her childhood.

Officially “retired” from several banks in Pell City, Underwood found herself with a new career by accident after sharing a batch of her fried fruit pies with her coworkers. These days, she’s up frying pastries as early as 5 a.m., but sill manages to have more energy than people half her age.

A few weeks after this story was published earlier his fall, I ran into Frankie in a supermarket near my home. She says she’s gotten a lot of comments as well as a boatload of new orders. She told me, while standing in the check out line, that I’ve caused her to have to work harder than she ever wanted to. I believe she was just joking with me.

Anyway, read the piece, send me a note at loyd@loydmcintosh.com, and let me know what you think.

Ye Ole Tailgater!If you’ve ever thought that all Englishmen were soccer fans first and foremost, then you’ve obviously never met or heard of Adam Goldstein. A native of London, Goldstein is a lifelong fan of American football, specifically the Chicago Bears. However, it wasn’t until a recent trip to see his beloved Bears play the Arizona Cardinals that he learned of the uniquely American tradition of tailgating. Wanting to learn, and experience, as much as he could about tailgating, Goldstein spent a year traveling the United States to see every NFL team in action. He documented his experiences in a new book, Tailgate To Heaven, published by Potomac Books. In an article I wrote for the October issue of Tailgater Monthly, I had a chance to interview Goldstein and talk to him about his travels, the people he met, and his thoughts on American football. Take a few minutes to check out my story and drop me a line at loyd@loydmcintosh.com and let me know what you think.Cheers!

Ye Ole Tailgater!

If you’ve ever thought that all Englishmen were soccer fans first and foremost, then you’ve obviously never met or heard of Adam Goldstein. A native of London, Goldstein is a lifelong fan of American football, specifically the Chicago Bears. However, it wasn’t until a recent trip to see his beloved Bears play the Arizona Cardinals that he learned of the uniquely American tradition of tailgating. Wanting to learn, and experience, as much as he could about tailgating, Goldstein spent a year traveling the United States to see every NFL team in action. He documented his experiences in a new book, Tailgate To Heaven, published by Potomac Books.

In an article I wrote for the October issue of Tailgater Monthly, I had a chance to interview Goldstein and talk to him about his travels, the people he met, and his thoughts on American football. Take a few minutes to check out my story and drop me a line at loyd@loydmcintosh.com and let me know what you think.

Cheers!

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Blast from the Past!

I’m currently working on an idea for a magazine article I want to pitch about the more bizarre instances in the history of soccer in America. This video is a short highlight reel from the United Soccer Association championship match way back in 1967. The final matched the Los Angeles Wolves against the Washington Whips in an incredibly high-scoring affair with Los Angeles winning 6-5, scoring the winning goal after over 30 minutes of overtime.

The United Soccer Association (USA) is interesting for another rather odd reason, however. The league was originally scheduled to begin play in 1968 but after another star- up league - the National Professional Soccer League - planned to begin play in 1967, USA officials made the decision to move their start up date a year earlier. In order to get teams on the field, league officials imported entire teams from Europe and South America to represent teams in various cities. For instance, the aforementioned L.A. Wolves were actually the Wolverhampton Wanderers from the English Premiere League and the Washington Whips were represented by Aberdeen F.C. from Scotland.

It may come as no surprise that the USA only lasted for one season - as did the NPSL. The rival leagues morphed into the North American Soccer League (NASL), which was America’s only true professional soccer league from 1968 until the league folded in 1984.Enhanced by Zemanta